Grammar Patterns

11 Link verbs used without a following Complement

11 Link verbs used without a following Complement

Verbs meaning 'seem' can be used by themselves, without a following Complement, in clauses beginning with as or than. This structure is used when you are making a comparison between what someone or something appears to be like and what they are really like.
He is much more astute than he seems.
This is not as simple as it sounds.
The verb be is used by itself in comparative clauses, and also when confirming or contradicting a statement and in short answers to questions.
He's smarter than I am.
'Pat Norton is your brother-in-law?' 'Yes, he is.'
Be is also used to form question tags, which ask the hearer or reader to confirm a statement. The verb follows a clause and is followed by a noun group, which is its Subject.
You're not from here, are you?
It's very difficult, isn't it?
Be is also used after so, nor, or neither to indicate a situation that is similar to one mentioned in a previous clause. The verb is followed by a noun group, which is its Subject.
They're strong, yes, but so are we.
'I'm not worried about Mrs Parfitt.' 'Neither am I.'

See related content

English Dictionary
English Dictionary
NEW from Collins!
NEW from Collins!
English Word Lists
English Word Lists
Easy Learning English Grammar
Easy Learning English Grammar
Word Lover's Blog
Word Lover's Blog
Online Scrabble Checker
Online Scrabble Checker
The Paul Noble Method
The Paul Noble Method
Create an account and sign in to access this FREE content
Register now or login in to access