आराम से सीखना

Quantifiers - आसानी से व्याकरण सीखे

Quantifiers are used to indicate the amount or quantity of something referred to by a noun. They are different from numbers because they indicate an approximate amount rather than an exact amount. They can be grouped according to their use.

all, some, any, much, enough, no

  • You can use all, some, any, or enough, before a plural countable noun or an uncountable noun.
    • Can I have some chips, please?
    • Anna gave me all her money.
    • Peter never has any time to visit us.
    You can use no before a singular or a plural countable noun or an uncountable noun.
    • There were no pictures of the party.
    • There is no hospital in this town.
    • No information has been released yet.
  • Some, any, much, and enough are used to refer to a part of the item.
    • Would you like some ice cream?
    • We didn’t have much success.
    • I haven’t seen enough evidence to convince me.
    • I couldn’t find any fresh milk at the shop.
    All and no refer to the whole of the item.
    • All the milk has been used.
    • There is no milk in the fridge.
  • Some is used in positive sentences.
  • I’ve bought some chocolate.
  • I saw some lovely shoes in town this morning.
  • Any is used in negative sentences.
  • I didn’t buy any chocolate this week.
  • I haven’t seen any birds in the garden today.
  • In questions, any is used when there is no particular expectation about the answer; some is used when the answer is expected to be positive.
  • Have you got any fresh bread?
  • Has Paul heard any news about the accident?
  • Would you like some cake, Aisha?
  • The use of no with there is/are is very common.
  • There was no post today.
  • There are no jobs available for electricians at the moment.

half, double, both

  • Half can be used with countable nouns and with uncountable nouns.
  • Half the time I didn’t understand what was going on.
  • Half the students came from overseas.
  • Double is used with uncountable nouns.
  • We’re going to need double the present supply of water.
  • They want double the money they originally asked for.
  • Both is used to define two things represented by a plural countable noun.
  • Both men were given another chance.
  • Both dogs had to be put down.
See Determiners for more information about quantifiers when they are used with other determiners.The following quantifiers are used to express graded amounts of an item (e.g. whether there is more or less of something).
  • Have you seen many tourists in town?
  • Yes, I’ve seen more tourists than usual.
  • I think most tourists just stay for a couple of days.
  • I didn’t put much petrol in the car.
  • I think we need more petrol.
  • The news caused much excitement.
  • Most information about our services is available on the Internet.
  • Many, more, most are used with graded quantities of plural countable nouns.
  • Have you seen many tourists in town?
  • Yes, I’ve seen more tourists than usual.
  • I think most tourists just stay for a couple of days.
  • Much, more, most are used with graded quantities of uncountable nouns.
  • I didn’t put much petrol in the car.
  • I think we need more petrol.
  • The news caused much excitement.
  • Most information about our services is available on the Internet.
  • Few, fewer, fewest are used with graded quantities of plural countable nouns.
  • Few people know the answer to this problem.
  • Fewer loans are being granted than usual.
  • Japanese workers take the fewest holidays.
  • Little, less, least are used with graded quantities of uncountable nouns.
  • There is little chance of rain today.
  • This technique causes less harm to the environment.
  • I need to get from one place to another with the least inconvenience.
  • A few, and a little are different from few and little on their own because they have a positive sense. Few means ‘not many’,
    • Few buildings survived the earthquake.
    but a few means ‘several’.
    • A few kind people helped the injured man.
    • A few delays are inevitable.
    Little means ‘not much’,
    • The students were given very little help with their projects.
    • Edward got little encouragement from his parents.
    but a little means ‘some’.
  • I need a little help from my friends.
  • Everyone needs a little encouragement now and then.
  • Do you take sugar? – Just a little, please.
Few and little are often used in a negative sense to suggest disappointment or pessimism, while a few and a little are used in a positive sense to suggest that things are better than they might have been.

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