Grammatica

V n

Structure II: Verb with Object

Active voice: V n
 Verb groupnoun group
SubjectVerbObject
Ifearno-one.
A number of insurgent groupshave formedan alliance.
Uniformed police on motor cyclesheadedthe procession.
Passive voice: be V-ed
 Verb group
SubjectVerbAdjunct (optional)
Shehad been freedon humanitarian grounds.
This venueis directly fundedby the City Council.
Phrasal verbsActive voice: V n P, V P n, V P P n
 Verb groupnoun groupParticle
SubjectVerb...Object...Verb
 Eatthe biscuitsup.
A carranthemdown.
 Verb groupParticlenoun group
SubjectVerbObject
Wemust closeupthe house.
Iwas gainingonhim.
Isetupthe computer.
 Verb groupParticleParticlenoun group
SubjectVerbObject
Albertis cominguptohis 30th birthday.
The foodlivesuptothe restaurant's reputation.
Passive voice: be V-ed P
 Verb groupParticle
SubjectVerbAdjunct (optional)
The photosmust have been blownup. 
Thousands of operationsare carriedouteach year.
Most phrasal verbs have the patterns V n P and V P n (not pron). That is, the noun group comes either between the verb and the particle or after the particle. If the noun group comes after the particle, it cannot be a personal pronoun. You say He filled it up or He filled up the barrel but you do not say He filled up it.However, some phrasal verbs have the pattern V P n only. That is, the noun group comes after the particle and it is sometimes a personal pronoun. You say He went without his lunch or He went without it but you do not say He went it without.The two kinds of phrasal verbs are shown separately in the lists below.Verbs with this structure cover a very wide range of meanings. There are also many types of relationship between the verb and the noun group. The meaning groups in this section are grouped into larger groups, each showing one kind of relationship between the verb and the noun group:
    II.1 The 'kill', 'eat', and 'fix' groups: concrete actions which change or affect the thing indicated by the noun group.
    The soldiers destroyed the building.
    II.2 The 'bring', 'buy', and 'operate' groups: concrete or abstract actions which involve moving something, physically or metaphorically.
    He sold his books.
    II.3 The 'cover', 'follow', and 'record' groups: concrete actions which do not change, move, or affect the thing indicated by the noun group.
    They recorded the bird's song.
    II.4 The 'build' group: concrete actions which create the thing indicated by the noun group.
    They built a large tower.
    II.5 The 'change', 'concern', and 'arrange' groups: abstract actions which change or affect the thing indicated by the noun group.
    They increased the price.
    II.6 The 'watch', 'break a record', and 'approve' groups: abstract actions which do not affect the thing indicated by the noun group.
    She watched her favourite television programme.
    II.7 The 'form' group: abstract actions which create the thing indicated by the noun group.
    She established a hostel for battered wives.
    II.8 The 'start' and 'stop' group: starting, finishing, or doing an action in a particular way.
    They abandoned the climb.
    II.9 The 'do' and 'take', 'turn a corner', and 'open your eyes' groups: concrete and abstract actions expressed by the verb and the noun group together.
    I had a bath.
    II.10 The 'face', 'take three days', and 'next week sees' groups: relations of place and time expressed by the verb and the noun group together.
    The meeting lasted an hour.
    II.11 The 'top', 'develop', and 'include' groups: qualities or roles of the Subject expressed by the verb and the noun group together.
    The child developed several bad habits.
    II.12 The 'show', 'allow', and 'identify' groups: logical relations between Subject and Object.
    The experiments confirm our theory.
    II.13 The 'hear', 'interest', and 'give an impression' groups: thoughts, feelings and perceptions.
    They heard a loud cry.
    II.14 The 'say', 'describe', and 'call' groups: acts of communication.
    I asked three questions.
V n is by far the most frequent verb pattern in English. The lists below contain only verbs which are among the 400 most frequently occurring verbs in the Collins Corpus. A typical Object is indicated in brackets where this is helpful.Not all the verbs with this structure are used in the passive. Verbs which never or rarely occur in the passive are indicated with an asterisk (*) in the lists below.
II.1 The 'kill', 'eat', and 'fix' groupsII.2 The 'bring', 'buy', and 'operate' groupsII.3 The 'cover', 'follow', and 'record' groupsII.4 The 'build' groupII.5 The 'change', 'concern', and 'arrange' groupsII.6 The 'watch', 'break a record', and 'approve' groupsII.7 The 'form' groupII.8 The 'start' and 'stop' groupII.9 The 'do' and 'take', 'turn a corner', and 'open your eyes' groupsII.10 The 'face', 'take three days', and 'next week sees' groupsII.11 The 'top', 'develop', and 'include' groupsII.12 The 'show', 'allow', and 'identify' groupsII.13 The 'hear', 'interest', and 'give an impression' groupsII.14 The 'say', 'describe', and 'call' groupsStructure information: Verb with Object

Vedi contenuto correlato

NUOVO da Collins!
NUOVO da Collins!
Elenchi di parole inglesi
Elenchi di parole inglesi
Ultime parole inviate
Ultime parole inviate
Facile apprendimento della grammatica inglese
Facile apprendimento della grammatica inglese
COBUILD Grammar Patterns
COBUILD Grammar Patterns
Blog di amanti delle parole
Blog di amanti delle parole
Scrabble Checker online
Scrabble Checker online
The Paul Noble Method
The Paul Noble Method
Create an account and sign in to access this FREE content
Register now or login in to access